Reader Response [Final Draft]

In the article of “Floor lights help ‘smartphone zombies’ keep an eye on the road,” Tan (2017) stated that an initiative by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) shall be introduced at two road-crossings strategically selected, featuring light-emitting diode (LED) Strips embedded in the pavements, to reduce the increasing quantity of accidents involving pedestrians. This trial will be carried out for six months, gauging its suitability to Singapore’s weather as well as its effectiveness. Visible in both day and night, the LED strips mimics the sequence of the traffic lights, going from steady green to flashing green then to steady red. Meant to aid pedestrians ranging from the youth to elderly pedestrians, the author noted that it would be especially useful in combatting the “smartphone zombies” phenomena caused by people walking with their eyes fixated on their mobile devices. Although Tan mentioned that this trial can be beneficial in reducing accidents caused by the smartphone phenomena, this article would have been more comprehensive if the consequences on the victims as well as initiatives in other countries meant to counteract this phenomena that Tan briefly mentioned were discussed in detail.

Tan’s article lacked in the provision of undesirable consequence posed by the implementation of LED strips on “smartphone zombies”, whereby their behaviour would be encouraged and the overall phenomena would be worsened. Although floor lights will be synchronised with traffic lights, it should not be taken for granted that traffic accidents will not occur even when the green man is flashing. Ho (2015) reported an accident involving a pedestrian who was using her phone whilst crossing the road as the green man was flashing and a cab that did not stop at a red traffic light. This goes to show that observations by pedestrians are important even when abiding by traffic rules. Based on an article “Pavement lights guide ‘smartphone zombies’,”  published by BBC News (2017), it detailed that an identical initiative had been implemented in Netherlands to aid smartphone users in crossing roads safely. However, according to Jose de Jong of the Dutch Traffic Safety Association, the initiative is viewed as rewarding bad behaviour, whereby ‘smartphone zombies’ are encouraged and aided to use their phone whilst crossing the road instead of being alert to their surroundings and ensure that cars are stopping at red lights. Therefore, Tan’s article would have been more beneficial for readers if such consequences were discussed, allowing readers to better understand the implications of such an implementation.

In Tan’s article, though briefly mentioned, lacked references of efforts by other countries in combatting the problems posed by the exponential increase in the “smartphone zombies” phenomena. Based on an article “Honolulu bans ‘smartphone zombies’ at road crossings,” published by The Straits Time (2017).In Hawaii’s largest city Honolulu, a ban had been imposed on pedestrians looking or using their mobile phones whilst crossing the streets, meant to reduce injuries and deaths caused by “distracted walking”. Adding on, campaigns such as ‘Look up look out’ had been organised by students from Nanyang Technological University, in an attempt to raise awareness through roadshows as well as school visits to educate youths on proper and adequate usage of smartphone under safe circumstances. Such campaigns and examples in both Singapore as well as overseas could have been mentioned and discussed in detail in Tan’s article, aiding readers in better understanding various means that could be explored by Singapore, aside from floor lights.

 

In conclusion, there was a significant lack in detailed discussions in both plausible consequences and efforts by other countries in Tan’s article. With the lack of exploration in both areas, the article might mislead readers to think that floor lights will be the most beneficial and appropriate implementation in Singapore. Therefore, Tan’s article would have been better if in-depth discussions on floor lights as well as other plausible implementations were provided.

 

BBC News. (2017, February 16). Pavement lights guide ‘smartphone zombies’ . Retrieved from BBC : http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-38992653

Ho, O. (2015, April 24). Caught on dash cam: Girl, checking phone, is hit while crossing road at green man. Retrieved from The Straits Times: http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/caught-on-dash-cam-girl-checking-phone-is-hit-while-crossing-road-at-green-man

The Straits Times. (2017 , 31 July). Honolulu bans ‘smartphone zombies’ at road crossings. Retrieved from The Straits Times: http://www.straitstimes.com/world/united-states/honolulu-bans-smartphone-zombies-at-road-crossings

Tan, C. (2017, May 10). Floor lights help ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road . Retrieved from The Straits Times : http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/floor-lights-help-smartphone-zombies-keep-eye-on-the-road

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Final Summary

In the article of “Floor lights help ‘smartphone zombies’ keep an eye on the road,”(Tan, 2017) stated that an initiative by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) shall be introduced at two road-crossings strategically selected, featuring LED Strips embedded in the pavements, to reduce the increasing quantity of accidents involving pedestrians. This trial will be carried out for six months, gauging its suitability to Singapore’s weather as well as its effectiveness. Visible in both day and night, the LED strips mimics the sequence of the traditional walking and standing man, going from steady green to flashing green then to steady red. Meant to aid pedestrians ranging from the youth to elderly pedestrians, Tan noted that it would be especially useful in combatting the “smartphone zombies” phenomena caused by people walking with their eyes fixated on their mobile devices. Although Tan mentioned that this trial can be beneficial in reducing accidents caused by the smartphone phenomena, this article would have been more comprehensive if the consequences on the victims as well as initiatives in other countries meant to counteract this phenomena that Tan briefly mentioned were discussed in detail

Technical Report Draft 2

  1. Executive summary

 

The problem of the entry system alongside AYE, at the back entrance of SIT@ Dover bottlenecks human traffic during peak hours. The majority of people entering and exiting the campus have priority over the minority, which causes the minority to awkwardly wait for the majority to pass which wastes time. Furthermore, the turnstile is not wheelchair friendly, and people carrying bulky items are unable to access the single turnstile. Additionally, after 11pm the turnstile locks automatically, which inconveniences students and teachers. The entry system is inefficient and causes frustration on a daily basis.

 

Based on a simple survey assessing the level of frustration students feel, about 78% of people feel frustrated over the inefficiency of the single turnstile and a substantial 90% of people would like a change in the single turnstile.

 

The solution is a dual turning turnstile with an exit button in the campus beside the turnstile.  Additionally, a side gate with a card reader will be installed – dedicated toward wheelchair users and for people who are carrying bulky objects.

 

 

  1. Background

Currently in SIT@ Dover, the entry system alongside AYE periodically holds up human traffic which frustrates students and staff alike who are waiting for their turn to enter the compound. While entering the school during peak hours, people at the other side of the turnstile wait awkwardly for their turn to get in or out of the school compound.

 

The entrance system is also not wheelchair friendly, and carrying bulky objects into the school compound through the single turnstile proves to be a real hassle.

 

Locking the turnstile utilizes very little electricity and tapping into the main power grid is unnecessary unless a mechanism malfunction happens.

 

It is also common for students and staff to stay in school till late at night, during exam and non-exam periods alike. During non-exam periods, the turnstile locks after 11pm, which inconveniences students and staff that take buses alongside AYE.

 

Based on a simple survey of 59 students at SIT (Appendix C), a majority of students feel frustrated while using the single turnstile, and if given the option would like a change in the entry system.

 

While this might be a relatively petty problem at first glance, improving the entry system will have a positive impact towards the overall mood and psychology of the person using the turnstile. This leaves a good impression of the school, allowing the user to start and end his/ her day on a more positive note. Students and staff should be able to enter and exit SIT@ Dover instantaneously.

 

Problem statement

The single-revolving turnstile at the entrance alongside AYE to SIT @Dover should be convenient to users and allow them to enter the campus without queueing up. In addition, people carrying bulky objects and wheelchair users are unable to enter the single turnstile. This creates inconvenience and limits human traffic flow to a one-way bottleneck

Implementing the appropriate facilities and a new turnstile design will improve user accessibility and alleviate the unnecessary waiting time.

 

  1. Purpose statement

This proposal’s objective is to propose to the Estates Division of SIT @Dover to upgrade the entry system alongside AYE. The improved entry system will ease human traffic flow during peak hours, be self-sustainable and wheelchair user friendly.


 

  1. Proposed solution for a “Sustainable Entry System”

The proposed solution consists of a self-sustaining dual-turnstile and a side gate. This will ease traffic flow and improve accessibility for wheelchair users and people carrying bulky objects.
5.1 Ease traffic congestion and improve efficiency

A dual-turnstile system is recommended. This eases the traffic congestion which allows students and staff to exit and enter the school compound simultaneously, improving efficiency and reliability. This also minimizes manpower while providing security and reduce the overall frustration. An exit button will be implemented at the side of the turnstile for students and staff who wish to leave the school compound after 11pm.
5.2 Sustainable Sources

The use of alternative energy will lessen energy consumption. As a person turns the turnstile, the gears will trigger the shaft rotation. Mechanical energy will then be converted into electrical energy by the generator and then stored into a supercapacitor which maintains security during power outages.
5.3 Card reader access for side gate

The side gate is designed primarily for wheelchair users and for those with bulky items (e.g. Personal Motorised Device (PMD), bicycles, school projects etc.) A card reader is installed beside the side gate, allowing entry for students and staff. A signage indicating the purpose of the side gate prompts students and staff from misusing it. Additionally, a closed-circuit television (CCTV) camera serves as a deterrence towards students misusing the side gate.

 

  1. Benefits of a Sustainable Entry System”

The improved entry system will save security manpower, be independent from the power grid and be wheelchair friendly.
6.1 Eases traffic congestions and improves efficiency

The improved full height dual turnstile will ease traffic congestion and improve the efficiency and reliability of the entry/ exit system. The proposed full height dual turnstile not only provide a high level of security, it minimizes the need for patrol along the campus. The improved turnstile will help reduce student’s and staff’s frustration towards the current single turnstile, which is a one-way entry or exit system. This will also speed up the process which improves the mood of the users.
6.2 Sustainability

Aside from improving convenience, the improved turnstile will also decrease energy consumption through the implementation of a kinetic powered generator installed in the turnstile which generates electricity when the turnstile is turned. The generated power will be stored in a capacitor which eliminates the tapping of electricity from the power grid to lock the turnstile after operating hours, which makes it almost entirely independent from the power grid. The turnstile will only tap into the power grid if the generator is faulty.
6.3 Students with bulky items and wheelchair users

The side gate is designed for people with bulky items and wheelchair users. Card readers are installed outside the gate, only allowing access for staff and students without the need to call for assistance. This implementation eases the inefficiency and complexity of the situation. Most importantly, this eliminates waiting time and improves convenience.

Ultimately, the side gate provides a positive image for the campus as this shows that the SIT committee cares and shows commitment to keep the campus safe while ensuring welfare towards students and staffs.

  1. Evaluation

Evaluation was done to ensure that the respondents’ and stakeholders concerns were identified to provide viable solutions to minimize the challenges through a simple survey (Appendix C). It is essential to design an effective system based on the response of the survey. 7.1 Student/Staff misusing the side gate

To counter such a challenge, signages will be displayed to deter users from intentionally using it without a legitimate reason. (Tan, 2016) stated that putting up signages is effective in deterrence. This method will effectively reduce such an encounter. Since a Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) camera is already installed, it can be used as a deterrence to prevent users from doing so.
7.2 Exiting after turnstile’s operating hours

Students in SIT often stay in school after 11pm. Students can only exit through the main gate after the turnstile’s operating hours which inconveniences those who wants to exit through the back gate. According to the survey (Refer to Appendix C), 90% of the respondents would like to be able to exit alongside AYE after campus operating hours. To address this concern, an exit button will be installed allowing students to unlock the door and exit. The turnstile will then be unlocked for a limited time, allowing one-way exit only. The placement of the button is placed inside the campus, far away from the reach of outsiders to prevent entry.
7.3 Power Outage

The stored power in the capacitor will provide power to lock the turnstile in case of a power outage. This “Fail-Safe” mode allow users to exit from the turnstile in a power outage scenario.

  1. Methods/Procedure

Research was carried out through a survey and findings of online news articles to support the improved turnstile. Our research focuses on the simultaneous accessibility of human traffic and a self-sustaining locking system. The main component of the research is through data collection, data analysis and the research of the turnstile’s mechanism. 8.1 Survey

Surveys questions are focused towards the response of students on the efficiency of the turnstile. According to the data, (Refer to Appendix C) 80% of respondents felt frustrated while waiting. 80% of respondents felt that the system was inefficient. 93% of the respondents would like a change in the current entry/ exit system.                8.2 Email

Next, Emails were sent to enquire on the operating hours. (Refer to Appendix F). The operating hours is used to determine the locking hours of the turnstile.
8.3 Online Research

Research was done via online on the various types of turnstile available in the market. Methods to harvest energy through kinetic energy and gear designs for maximum output was also considered. (Refer to Appendix D). In the article, ‘World First Energy-Generated Revolving Door,’’ (Chapa,2008) reported that the first energy generated turnstile was implemented in Netherland and it generates around 4,600kwh of energy per year, which shows that a self-sustainable turnstile is feasible.
8.4 Designs on proposed solutions

To provide a clear explanation of our proposed solutions. Design ideas were discussed and drawn. (Refer to Appendix E)

  1. Concluding statement

CRAZ strongly believes that the full height dual turnstile will effectively ease student’s and staff’s frustration towards the current turnstile alongside AYE at SIT@ Dover. The first step in starting the day right is your first step into the campus. By improving the efficiency and reliability of the entry/ exit system, it improves the student’s and staff’s mood. Students and Staff alike that work/ study till late at night will be able to do it peacefully without the burdensome thought of detouring. As undergraduates of Sustainable Infrastructure, it is only natural for us to take sustainability into account and design it to be self-sustainable.

The survey response expresses a consensus toward a change in the current the single-turnstile system (Appendix C). Finally, the full height dual turnstile system will benefit everyone inside and outside the campus. Staff, students and public alike.

.

[oz2]

Technical Report [Draft 1]

Background

Currently in SIT@ Dover, the single turnstile alongside AYE periodically holds up human traffic which frustrates students and staff alike to be waiting for their turn to enter the compound. When entering the school during peak hours, people at the other side of the turnstile must wait awkwardly for their turn to enter or exit. Based on a simple survey of 59 students (Appendix C), a great majority of students feel frustrated while using the single turnstile and if given the option, would like a change in the single turnstile system.

The single turnstile is also not wheelchair friendly and carrying bulky objects into the school compound through the single turnstile proves to be a real hassle. This problem could potentially alienate wheelchair users from the school.

Self-sustainability is another issue we tackled. Locking the turnstile after 11pm utilizes very little electricity and tapping into the main grid is unnecessary unless the mechanism malfunctions.

Lastly, it is common for students and staff to stay in school till late. During non-exam periods, the turnstile locks after 11pm, which inconveniences students and staff that only takes the bus/ buses alongside AYE.

While this might be a relatively petty problem at first glance, improving the entry/ exit system will have a positive impact towards the overall mood and psychology of the person using the turnstile. This leaves a good impression of the school, allowing the user to start and end his/ her day on a more positive note. Students and staff alike should be able to enter and exit SIT@ Dover with ease.

 

Problem statement
The single-revolving turnstile at the entrance alongside AYE should be convenient to users and allow them to enter the campus without queueing up. However, the current turnstile limits human traffic flow to a one-way bottleneck. In addition, people carrying bulky objects and wheelchair users are unable to access the single-revolving turnstile, which results in a waste of time.

Implementing the appropriate facilities and a new turnstile design will improve user accessibility and alleviate the unnecessary waiting time.

Purpose statement

This proposal’s objective is to propose to the Estates Division of SIT @Dover to upgrade the entry/ exit system alongside AYE. The single turnstile at the entrance to SIT@ Dover creates a bottleneck when people enter/ exit the school compound concurrently. People are also unable to exit the school compound through the turnstile after situated timings. Additionally, turnstile users with bulky objects and wheelchair users will not be able to access through the single turnstile forcing them to detour. The improved entry/ exit system will ease human traffic flow during peak hours and be wheelchair friendly.

Reader Response Draft 3

In the article of “Floor lights help ‘smartphone zombies’ keep an eye on the road,”(Tan, 2017) stated that an initiative by the Land Transport Authority (LTA) shall be introduced at two road-crossings strategically selected, featuring LED Strips embedded in the pavements, to reduce the increasing quantity of accidents involving pedestrians. This trial will be carried out for six months, gauging its suitability to Singapore’s weather as well as its effectiveness. Visible in both day and night, the LED strips mimics the sequence of the traditional walking and standing man, going from steady green to flashing green then to steady red. Meant to aid pedestrians ranging from the youth to elderly pedestrians, Tan noted that it would be especially useful in combatting the “smartphone zombies” phenomena caused by people walking with their eyes fixated on their mobile devices. Although Tan mentioned that this trial can be beneficial in reducing accidents caused by the smartphone phenomena, this article would have been more comprehensive if the consequences on the victims as well as initiatives in other countries meant to counteract this phenomena that Tan briefly mentioned were discussed in detail.

Tan’s article lacked in the provision of undesirable consequence posed by the implementation of LED strips on “smartphone zombies”, whereby their behaviour would be encouraged and the overall phenomena would be worsened. Although floor lights will be synchronised with traffic lights, it should not be taken for granted that traffic accidents will not occur even when the green man is flashing. (Ho, 2015) reported an accident involving a pedestrian who was using her phone whilst crossing the road as the green man was flashing and a cab that did not stop at a red traffic light. This goes to show that observations by pedestrians are important even when abiding by traffic rules. In the article by (BBC News, 2017), it detailed that an identical initiative had been implemented in Netherlands to aid smartphone users in crossing roads safely. However, according to Jose de Jong of the Dutch Traffic Safety Association, the initiative is viewed as rewarding bad behaviour, whereby ‘smartphone zombies’ are encouraged and aided to use their phone whilst crossing the road instead of being alert to their surroundings and ensure that cars are stopping at red lights. Therefore, Tan’s article would have been more beneficial for readers if such consequences were discussed, allowing readers to better understand the implications of such an implementation.

In Tan’s article, though briefly mentioned, lacked references of efforts by other countries in combatting the problems posed by the exponential increase in the “smartphone zombies” phenomena. In Hawaii’s largest city Honolulu, a ban had been imposed on pedestrians looking or using their mobile phones whilst crossing the streets, meant to reduce injuries and deaths caused by “distracted walking”  (The Straits Times, 2017 ). Not only so, campaigns such as ‘Look up look out’ had been organised by students from Nanyang Technological University, in an attempt to raise awareness through roadshows as well as school visits to educate youths on proper and adequate usage of smartphone under safe circumstances. Such campaigns and examples in both Singapore as well as overseas could have been mentioned and discussed in detail in Tan’s article, aiding readers in better understanding various means that could be explored by Singapore, aside from floor lights.

 

In conclusion, there was a significant lack in detailed discussions in both plausible consequences and efforts by other countries in Tan’s article. With the lack of exploration in both areas, the article might mislead readers to think that floor lights will be the most beneficial and appropriate implementation in Singapore. Therefore, Tan’s article would have been better if in-depth discussions on floor lights as well as other plausible implementations were provided.

 

BBC News. (2017, February 16). Pavement lights guide ‘smartphone zombies’ . Retrieved from BBC : http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-38992653

Ho, O. (2015, April 24). Caught on dash cam: Girl, checking phone, is hit while crossing road at green man. Retrieved from The Straits Times: http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/caught-on-dash-cam-girl-checking-phone-is-hit-while-crossing-road-at-green-man

The Straits Times. (2017 , 31 July). Honolulu bans ‘smartphone zombies’ at road crossings. Retrieved from The Straits Times: http://www.straitstimes.com/world/united-states/honolulu-bans-smartphone-zombies-at-road-crossings

Tan, C. (2017, May 10). Floor lights help ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road . Retrieved from The Straits Times : http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/floor-lights-help-smartphone-zombies-keep-eye-on-the-road

Reader Response Draft 2

In the article, “Floor lights helps ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road,” Tan (2017) states that Land Transport Authority (LTA) launched an initiative to counter Singaporeans not keeping an eye on the road by embedding ground LED lights at pedestrian crossings. Tan comment that despite the cost, they were installed along places with high pedestrian volume and a diverse age group. Tan also mention that the ground light mimics the sequence of traditional traffic lights and the implementation helps to gauge whether the lights are suitable for Singapore’s climate. Other countries implemented fines and signage’s to counteract against phone addicts. While installing LED lights is a good initiative by LTA, the initiative will only do more harm than good. It will perpetuate pedestrians’ bad habit and influence safety of other road user.

Singaporeans will rely more on the groud lighting to guide them across the road. According to the article “Dutch town launches traffic light for zombie smartphone users,” (2017), a spokesman states that this initiative will only introduce more bad habits. Spoon-feeding pedestrian only temporary reduce the accident rate. The ideology will slowly start to diversify, on the assumption that it is safe to use phone while crossing. By guiding them to cross the road safely will only increase their reliance on ground lights. Incidents will increase once it becomes a habit.

Next, drivers do play a part in road safety too. In the article “83% of Singapore drivers use their mobile phones while driving: Survey,” (2013), A survey was conducted to analyze if driver uses their phone while driving and the results were startling. 8 out of 10 surveyors use their phone while driving, thinking that it was safe to do so and felt there was a need to reply text. It is both pedestrian and driver’s responsibility to ensure their own safety. To counter such problems, LTA has rolled out new laws with regards to using phone while driving in February 1,2015. “Mobile devices and driving: What you need to know about changes to Road Traffic Act from Feb 1,” Heng (2015) states that offenders will be fined up to $1,000 and/or jailed up to 6 months. Fines of repeated offenders will be doubled. This might be the best way to deter driver from using phones. It seems likely that the only way to stop bad habits is to impose strict laws or educate them, not assisting them. With strict laws, it is certain that there will be a distinct reduction. For example, the reason why Singapore is a clean and green city is because our founding father Mr. Lee noted that for Singapore to be a clean country, public hygiene standards must be raised. In the article “Keep Singapore Clean campaign,” (2012), Mr Lee states that to ensure cleanliness, everybody must be more aware and conscious for their actions. Otherwise the government will impose a fine on litterbugs.

To scale down the number of “smartphone zombies”, Campaigns and laws can be organized and impose to educate people of all ages on the risk and consequences of using phone while crossing the road. Campaigns such as ‘Look up look out’ by a group of NTU students to raise awareness by organising roadshows, school visiting to educate youths on the consequences. Such campaigns allow target audience to get exposed to their current habits and the consequences they might face. In my opinion, I believe that to eliminate ‘Smartphone zombies’, we should educate younger generations. We should educate and instil good habits in them. In the long run, the number of ‘Smartphone zombies’ will definitely be reduced. However, if the number continues to escalate, imposing fines on them might be a more effective way to deter them from doing it. Even though installing ground lights aids in the safety of pedestrian, I strongly believe that safety is one responsibility and by aiding them, it will only increase their bad habits.

 

Floor Lights help ‘smartphone zombies’ keep an eye on the road (2017). Straits Times. Retrieved, May,10,2017 from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/floor-lights-help-smartphone-zombies-keep-eye-on-the-road

Keep Singapore Clean campaign (2012). National Library Board. Retrieved, 2012, from http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_1160_2008-12-05.html

LTA trials flashing pavements at pedestrian crossings (2017). Straits Times. Retrieved, May 9,2017, from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/lta-trials-flashing-pavements-at-pedestrian-crossings

Look up, look out campaign (2015). NTU. Retrieved, May 11,2015, from https://repository.ntu.edu.sg/handle/10356/63178?show=full

Mobile devices and driving: What you need to know about changes to Road Traffic Act from Feb 1(2015). Straits Times. Retrieved, January 28,2015, from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/mobile-devices-and-driving-what-you-need-to-know-about-changes-to-road-traffic

S’poreans are getting injured because of mobile phone use while walking (2015). Mothership. Retrieved, February 11,2015, from https://mothership.sg/2015/02/sporeans-are-getting-injured-because-of-mobile-phone-use-while-walking/

Traffic lights built into pavement for smartphone-using pedestrians in Netherlands (2017). Independent. Retrieved, February 16,2017, from http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/traffic-lights-pavement-smartphone-users-look-down-dutch-pedestrians-netherlands-a7584081.html

83% of Singapore drivers use their mobile phones while driving: Survey (2013). Today Online. Retrieved, November 6 ,2013, from http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/83-singapore-drivers-use-their-mobile-phones-while-driving-survey

 

 

Updated (12/10/17)

Reader Response Draft 1

In the article, “Floor lights helps ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road,” Tan (2017) addressed that Land transport authority (LTA) launched an initiative to counter Singaporeans not keeping an eye on the road by installing ground LED lights at pedestrian crossings. Despite the high cost, they were installed along places with high pedestrian volume and a diverse age group. The ground lights follow the timings of the current traffic light, it also helps to gauge whether the lights are suitable for Singapore’s climate. Other countries also practice similar concept through fines and signage against phone addicts. While installing LED lights is a good initiative by LTA, this approach will have negative consequences by increasing pedestrian’s reliance on the lights.

In a bid to counteract the phenomena of Singaporeans looking down on their phones whilst crossing the road, the initiative will only do more harm than good. Singaporeans will rely more on the ground lighting to guide them across the road. According to the article “Dutch town launches traffic light for zombie smartphone users,” (2017), a spokesman states that this initiative will only introduce more bad habits. In my opinion, I believe that by spoon-feeding them to reduce the accident rate is only temporary. The ideology will slowly start to diversify, on the assumption that it is safe to use phone while crossing. By guiding them to cross the road safely will only increase their reliance on ground lights. Incidents will increase once it becomes a habit. Sharp (2015) states that in 2013 a tourist fell off a pier while using her phone in Melbourne and almost drowned. According to an article “S’poreans are getting injured because of mobile phone use while walking,” (2015) a survey was conducted by a group of students from Nanyang Technology University (NTU) on 419 youths and the results shows that almost 90% realise the danger of using phones while walking. Amongst the surveyed, the main cause of accidents is due to distractions ranging from falls to vehicular accidents. From the survey and news articles, habit plays an important role in road safety and it resulted pedestrian to be complacent on their safety.

Secondly, drivers do play a part in road safety too. In the article “83% of Singapore drivers use their mobile phones while driving: Survey,” (2013), A survey was conducted to analyze if driver uses their phone while driving and the results were startling. 8 out of 10 surveyors use their phone while driving, thinking that it was safe to do so and felt there was a need to reply text. I believe that to ensure road safety, both pedestrian and driver should both do their part by not using phones while on the road. To counter such problems, LTA has rolled out the new laws with regards to using phone while driving in February 1,2015. In the article “Mobile devices and driving: What you need to know about changes to Road Traffic Act from Feb 1,” (2015) states that offenders will be fined up to $1,000 and/or jailed up to 6 months. Fines of repeated offenders will be doubled. This might be the best way to deter driver from using phones. In my opinion, the only way to stop bad habits is to impose strict laws or educate them and not assist them. For example, the reason why Singapore is a clean and green city is because Mr. Lee noted that for Singapore to be a clean country, public hygiene standards has to be raised. In the article “Keep Singapore Clean campaign,” (2012), Mr Lee stated that to ensure cleanliness, everybody must be more aware and conscious for their actions. Otherwise the government will impose a fine on litterbugs.

Lastly, Campaigns and laws should be organized and imposed to educate people of all ages on the risk and consequences of using phone while crossing the road. Campaigns such as ‘Look up look out’ by a group of NTU students to raise awareness by organising roadshows, school visiting to educate youths on the consequences. Such campaigns allow target audience to get exposed to their current habits and the consequences they might face. In my opinion, I believe that to eliminate ‘Smartphone zombies’, we should educate younger generations. We should educate and instil good habits in them. In the long run, the number of ‘Smartphone zombies’ will definitely be reduced. However, if the number of ‘Smartphone zombies’ is too high, imposing fines on them might be a more effective way to deter them from doing it. Even though installing ground lights aids in the safety of pedestrian, I strongly believe that safety is one responsibility and by aiding them, it will only increase their reliance on the ground lights.

 

 

Keep Singapore Clean campaign (2012). National Library Board. Retrieved, 2012, from http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/infopedia/articles/SIP_1160_2008-12-05.html

LTA trials flashing pavements at pedestrian crossings (2017). Straits Times. Retrieved, May 9,2017, from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/lta-trials-flashing-pavements-at-pedestrian-crossings

Traffic lights built into pavement for smartphone-using pedestrians in Netherlands (2017). Independent. Retrieved, February 16,2017, from http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/traffic-lights-pavement-smartphone-users-look-down-dutch-pedestrians-netherlands-a7584081.html

Beware the smartphone zombies blindly wandering around Hong Kong (2015). South China Morning Post. Retrieved, April 16,2015, from http://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/technology/article/1725001/smartphone-zombies-are-putting-your-life-and-theirs-danger

S’poreans are getting injured because of mobile phone use while walking (2015). Mothership. Retrieved, February 11,2015, from https://mothership.sg/2015/02/sporeans-are-getting-injured-because-of-mobile-phone-use-while-walking/

83% of Singapore drivers use their mobile phones while driving: Survey (2013). Today Online. Retrieved, November 6 ,2013, from http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/83-singapore-drivers-use-their-mobile-phones-while-driving-survey

Mobile devices and driving: What you need to know about changes to Road Traffic Act from Feb 1(2015). Straits Times. Retrieved, January 28,2015, from http://www.straitstimes.com/singapore/transport/mobile-devices-and-driving-what-you-need-to-know-about-changes-to-road-traffic

Look up, look out campaign (2015). NTU. Retrieved, May 11,2015, from https://repository.ntu.edu.sg/handle/10356/63178?show=full

Summary

In the article, “Floor lights helps ‘smartphone zombies’ keep eye on the road,” Tan (2017) addressed that Singaporeans tend to look down on their phones while crossing the road, Land transport authority  (LTA) launched an initiative to counter the issue by installing ground LED lights at pedestrian crossings.

The costly LED lights were installed along places at high pedestrian volume with diverse age group. The ground lights follow the timings of the current traffic light, it also helps to gauge whether the lights are suitable for Singapore’s climate. Other countries also practice similar concept through fines and signage against phone addicts. While installing LED lights is a good initiative by LTA, this approach will have negative consequences by increasing pedestrian’s reliance on the lights.

 

 

Letter Of Introduction

Dear Professor Blackstone,

I am currently attending your module in Effective Communication and would like to introduce myself to you. My name is Zi Rui, currently studying in singapore institutite of technology (SIT) sustainable infrastructure engineering (building services). I graduated from Temasek Polytechnic in 2015, majoring in integrated facility management. During my second year in diploma, I was able to select an elective either in Aviation or Hospitality. I chose Aviation as my elective as I am interested and wish to expand and explore a different field of studies. After graduation, I decided to enroll into Sustainable Infrastructure Engineering because of the similarity between my diploma and degree in certain aspects. Also, to gain more knowledge and to pursue a career in this field of work.

My goals for the 3-4 years in SIT will be to gain more knowledge and skills which can be put to better use in the future. Also, to build up my confidence and communication skills and to achieve good results.

There are a few weaknesses in my communication skills, some of which is that I speak Chinese. As I am more comfortable in speaking Chinese, I tend to avoid speaking in English which in turns affected my communications with English speakers. This habit greatly affected me as I am unable to pronounce words and speaks confidently without slowing down, pausing for a moment or stutter. Secondly, I am an introvert and can only  speak comfortably and confidently only with people I know. My introvert characteristics do not only affect me socially, they affect my presentation skills too. I have to always remind myself to be confident and not shy away during presentations.

Despite my weaknesses, I am a team player. I am able to contribute to group projects, completing a task within the given time and ensuring my parts are done with appropriate standards. I enjoy working in groups and I am more comfortable working in small groups rather than bigger groups.

I believe that I will be able to communicate well and strengthen my presentation skills after completion of Effective Communications. And I believe you will be able to help us achieve our goals in communications skills by the end of this module. I look forward in working with you to improve myself and prepare for what is ahead in the future. Thank you.

Regards,

Zi Rui

 

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(Edited) 9 September 17

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